8-year-old Amaria Osby Killed By Her Mother For ‘Loving Her Father Too Much’

Amaria Osby, age 8, was killed by her mother in an Uptown home because she “loved her father too much.” Now that we have found new records, we may be able to determine whether Amaria’s murder had additional causes.

Amaria, who passed away at the age of eight, was noted by the Illinois Department of Children and Family Services as early as age three, according to a report by CBS 2’s Chris Tye on Tuesday night. The government acknowledged that the regulations, in this case, were broken. Still, we’re finding out that the account given to us for eight months may be substantially different from the version given to the mother, who is currently charged with murder.

Amaria’s mother, Andreal Hagler, persuaded her to drink bleach last May. Because “she loved her father more,” Hagler later acknowledged suffocating Amaria with a plastic bag.

A few hours earlier, state child welfare workers from DCFS paid Amaria and her mother a visit at their Uptown residence.

After receiving a report of neglect for Amaria in the spring, DCFS failed to attempt to contact the family for 60 days.

“60 days? A real kick in the face, “DeMarcus Osby, Amaria’s father, said to Tye of CBS 2 in June last year. “They might have captured her. My daughter might have been captured. My kid could have been rescued if they had grabbed her.”

DeMarcus Osby claimed to have reported the girl’s maltreatment in June, but he was repeatedly denied custody of the child. He shared his thoughts on the murder’s impetus.

Because, as Osby said in June, “she was honest with the agency.” “She was honest. She never lied.”

What was the truth she spoke?

Osby stated, “That her mother was abusing her.”

What those DCFS officers saw and said to Amaria’s mother in the hours leading up to the crime, however, are now more apparent according to a report obtained by CBS 2 from the Cook County Medical Examiner’s office.

Family members, according to the ME’s report. Osby was about to be taken away from her mother and given to a different guardian after her mother met with the Department of Children and Family Services.

If accurate, it contradicts the DCFS account of what happened in June. It said: “The mother and child were interviewed by the investigator who visited the family. Physical abuse or neglect was not cited as issues.”

In light of the updated information from the Medical Examiner’s office, we questioned DCFS about their stance on that June statement. No one has responded to us.

In this case, the DCFS employee and supervisor were both relieved of their child protective responsibilities.

One of them has returned to raising children. We were unable to get an update on the other from DCFS.

Amaria’s father declined to respond on Tuesday night, but his lawyers claim they acquired these new documents today and need some time to review them before making a statement.

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