Barry Season 3 Episode 5 Recap & Reviews: Past Destroys Present

I have nothing but good things to say about how fast and long Barry’s episodes are. In this fast-paced show, the story is moved along by kinetic energy. On the other hand, “crazytimesh*tshow” might be the first episode of the series to feel too much. This week’s episode looks at how Barry feels about them breaking up, as well as the fight between Bolivian and Chechen forces and Sally’s career in Hollywood.

Albert Nguyen, who was in the Marines with Barry, is also introduced as an FBI bad guy, and Julie (Annabeth Gish) and her son continue to plan to kill Barry. A new woman from Gene’s past who was hurt by him is also shown, and Fuches tries to get him into more trouble.

Because there are so many moving parts, and each one is interesting on its own, we can’t help but wonder what the others are like. If you look at the big picture, having this problem is a good thing. In the meantime, I hope that Barry’s many flying discs will land in ways that bring attention back to Barry and his tale.

At the start of the episode, we see a flashback to Barry’s time in the Marines, where Albert is shot and Barry tries desperately to save him. When we get to the present day, we find out that Albert has been asked to look into why Janice Moss was killed. Albert knows right away that “The Raven” is a fake and that the LAPD hasn’t done anything to help.

Albert says that Barry is helping with the investigation, but his actions show that he doesn’t see Barry as a part of the case at all. He wants the LAPD to go after the Chechens who are threatening to cut off the factory’s supply lines.

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For whatever reason, Elena comes to America to get revenge for her father’s death, which is perfect timing for Cristobal. At the same time that one of Hank’s guys is FaceTiming a senior Chechen mobster with a map, she tells the remaining Bolivians to do an operation against the Chechens.

The Bolivians arrive at their target just on time. From the above perspective, the raid is given a feeling of size. Chechen and Bolivian populations appear to be decreasing even further, according to this latest report.

Barry, on the other hand, is struggling to come to terms with his breakup with Sally. Cristobal and Hank appear to be the obvious sources of guidance, but Hank has some insightful thoughts to share. He’s right when he says that Barry’s double existence is making him into a pressure cooker that’s about to blow.

He proposes that he make an effort to reveal to Sally as much of his actual personality as possible. Barry, who has the emotional maturity of a schoolchild, decides to build a collage of photographs of Michael Jordan and Ohio to symbolize his actual personality. Because of her problems, Sally can’t focus on the conversation between Barry and Sally.

Sally’s program, Joplin, has been canceled, it has been revealed. It is revealed to Sally that Joplin isn’t attracting the attention of Banshee’s “taste clusters” after briefly being on its homepage. It’s another spot-on parody of Hollywood’s inconsistency and the increasing influence of “the algorithm” on artistic choices. There’s no way to protect the world from ending, even if Natalie gives Sally a heartfelt speech about how significant watching her creative process and work ethic has been.

The two reconnect and Barry tries to offer some advice when she returns to her apartment. When Barry advises breaking into the Banshee executive’s home and taking pictures of her sleeping or “changing the furniture so she believes she’s shrinking,” he uses a soothing and frightening tone.

With his casual demeanor, Barry’s increasing threats become even more hilarious. Any reasonable person would be shocked by this and insist that Barry leave. Despite previous clues, this was a new level of transparency for Barry. Sally reacted with disdain at the revelation. It will be interesting to see how he approaches her from this point on.

Gene, on the other hand, is slowly beginning to relish the second chance that Barry has provided him. This may be because Gene appears to be forgetting about what Barry has done and begins to focus on making up with his son by purchasing him a house.

At Joe Mantegna’s house, he attends a party, and while he appreciates Joe’s generosity, another party-goer is less forgiving. An ex-girlfriend of Gene’s named Annie claims that after their relationship ended, he blackballed her in New York and Los Angeles, effectively ruining her career as a director. After Gene’s apology tour, when will he turn his attention to Barry again?

Fuchs reappears and pays a visit to Taylor’s sister, who perished in a botched bum-rush on the Bolivian airfield back in season 1. There appears to be a growing army of angry relatives of Barry’s victims, but Fuches has a hand in all of this, and it’s only a matter of time before the truth comes to light.

After a disagreement with Sally, Julie and her son attempted to take Barry out, but Julie ended up accidentally shooting her kid in the stomach, underlining the need for people like Barry in the first place.

You wish more time had been spent on Gene’s mental state, Barry’s affections for Gene, or Barry trying to find out what went wrong with Sally. This fantastic show might use more character moments, but that’s a minor quibble.

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