California Guy Survives Frigid Waters for Five Hours

When a California man dropped off his fishing boat and into the Pacific Ocean, he feared he would die. But he was saved by an unusual ally: a seal.

Scott Thompson, a sea urchin diver, was killed after he slipped into the Santa Barbara Channel last month in the middle of the night.

According to him, the whole event resulted from a lack of judgment. After slipping and falling into the icy water, he was unconscious while wearing little more than a t-shirt and shorts. He had left the motor of his boat running, which meant that when he slumped over, the boat took off swiftly.

“This is exactly how I was planning on passing away,’ I thought to myself. ‘Today is the day that I will die,’ I tell myself, “Thompson expressed himself. “Then I understood, “OK, we’ve got difficulties,” as in, “OK, we have problems.”

And I began swimming as hard as I could towards the boat, and it didn’t take long for me to realize that, although the boat was going further away, I was getting no closer to it.”

A Harbor Seal Arose at the Correct Time

At that time, Thompson was terrified that he might perish out there. Panic had already started to set in for him when he heard a splash. The moment he heard the splash, he said, “my heart just sprang out of my chest.”

He believed it was a shark at first. “At that moment, a little seal attached its head out of the water directly next to me and gazed at me with a look that said: “Dude!” What are you still doing here?”

For another five hours, the whale became Thompson’s “best pal.” He would bob up or down in the water, then go down underneath, come back up, and gaze at Thompson.

The seal even poked him in the butt many times, almost as though the seal was encouraging him to hurry up.

It turns out it was the boost that Thompson needed. He knew he would never make it to his boat by swimming, so he decided to aim for an oil platform rather. It took him nearly five hours to get there.

“It began growing lighter, but I’m just like, I’m weeping,” recounted Thompson. “And I’m like, screaming at the top of my lungs.”

Freezing Temps in the Pacific Ocean Are ‘Offensive’

Team members administered his first support when Thompson arrived at the oil platform. As reported by the New York Post, the Coast Guard ultimately transferred him to a hospital where he was diagnosed with hypothermia.

“Even setting on a wet suit, being organized, being in that water, and swimming to the platform was horrible,” said Paul Amaral, president of towing business Channel Watch Marine. “I can’t imagine getting in the sea with shorts and a T-shirt at night. There was no moon at all; in fact, it was completely dark.”

Thompson expressed his gratitude to everyone concerned, including the seal in his speech. “I feel that there is a greater force at work right now.

I’m not sure what it is, but there is a force larger than me at work, “he said. “That was revealed to me, and I will never again have any doubts about it for the rest of my life.”

His destiny had already been decided. Following his fall from his fishing boat into the chilly Pacific Ocean, a California man thought his life was over — but a friendly harbor seal appeared just in time to save him and assist him in getting to the safety of land.

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According to Thompson, an error in judgment caused Scott Thompson to tumble off his boat into the Santa Barbara Channel late one night last month, who works as a sea urchin diver. Thompson blamed the tragedy on his lack of experience.

“This is exactly how I was planning on passing away,’ I thought to myself. ‘Today is the day that I will die,’ I tell myself.” Thompson, wearing shorts and a T-shirt, spoke to KABC-TV about the incident.

Thompson claims that he forgot to turn off the boat’s engine, and it immediately sped away from him.

“That’s when I understood, like, ‘OK, we have issues,'” he added. “After that, I simply went out and began swimming as hard as I could towards the boat, and it didn’t take long for me to realize that it was going farther away, and I wasn’t getting any closer,” Thompson said that’s when he started to have concerns about his safety.

“The terror set in; it was as if someone had said, ‘Wow! This is a fairly dangerous scenario,'” he added, adding that he kept encouraging himself to keep swimming. During his survival mode, he continued to reiterate, “You have to return home to your family,” he said.

KABC said that Thompson was “devastating myself, through my imagination, just imaging my daughters and son growing up without me,” as well as his wife “not having a husband to support her,” as Thompson explained.

However, he suddenly claimed to have heard a loud splash, which he imagined a shark. As he described it in a long article on Peter Maguire’s blog “Sour Milk,” “When I heard that splash, my heart sprang out of my chest, and I was like, F—! A shark!”

“At that point, a little seal attached its head out of the water directly next to me and gazed at me with a look that said: “Dude!” What are you doing out in the middle of nowhere?”

Given that Thomson had no one else to turn to, the seal became his “perfect companion,” according to him.

“He reminded me of my dog. ‘Come here, little friend!’ says the teacher. “I told you,” I said. He’d bob up and down, gazing at me, then go underwater, pop back up, and gaze at me again, and so on and so on, “Thompson retold the story.

He said that the small pup repeatedly nudged him in the buttocks to encourage him into action.

“His words seemed to be saying something like “Hey Dude!” to me. Prepare to put your a– in gear and start moving! To keep my conversation going, I started singing Grateful Dead songs and making dumb dad jokes, much like I did with my kids at the time. “He penned a letter.

Buoyed by the cheering creature, Thompson felt motivated to swim to an oil platform, which he reached after nearly five hours, KABC said.

“And then the sky began to brighten, and I burst out laughing. And I’m like, screaming at the top of my lungs, “He told the radio station what he had to say.

The Coast Guard transported him to a nearby hospital to treat him for hypothermia. Crew members on the rig administered first treatment until the Coast Guard arrived.

According to Paul Amaral, head of the towing business Channel Watch Marine, even putting on a wet suit and being prepared, going in the water, and swimming to the platform was “horrendous.”

“Being in the ocean in shorts and a T-shirt at night is something I can’t comprehend. There was no moon at all; in fact, it was completely dark, “he said.

In his article, Thompson wrote: “I’m a believer that there is a greater power today. I’m not sure what it is, but a force larger than me is at work. I have seen that, and I will never again have any doubts about it for the rest of my life.”