Federal Prosecution Convicts Sheriff Victor Hill Of Civil Rights Violations

The Clayton County sheriff, Victor Hill, was convicted guilty of breaching the constitutional rights of inmates by a federal jury.

Out of seven accusations, he was found guilty on six and found not guilty on one.

Federal Prosecution Convicts Sheriff Victor Hill Of Civil Rights Violations
Federal Prosecution Convicts Sheriff Victor Hill Of Civil Rights Violations

Jurors started deliberating on Friday afternoon and worked through the week until they reached a verdict this afternoon.
Juror 6, the so-called “holdout,” spoke with Audrey Washington of Channel 2 to discuss whether or not he believes justice was done.

Justice, he claimed, had been done. We do not believe he has malicious intentions. We think there was a breach, and if so, it should be fixed.

Drew Findling, the defense counsel, expressed his dissatisfaction with the ruling to the Washington government.

It’s safe to assume an appeal will be filed, and I think it’s reasonable to assume, and I think most people would agree, that the ruling will be overturned, just as it has been in similar situations in the past.
There was no evidence of aggressive or unmanageable behavior from any detainees, according to federal prosecutors.

They claim the sheriff used the chair based entirely on their actions before to booking.

Prosecutors claim that Hill restrained a man for hours on a chair because the detainee had cursed at him before. Corrections officers testified that the detainee posed no threat at the time of restraint.

The chair can be used on prisoners only if it is determined that they pose a danger of injury to themselves or others, as required by federal law.

Last week, Hill testified in his own defense, stating he was unaware of any inmate being wounded by the chair and that he believed it to be safe.

On Tuesday, the court questioned one jury and withdrew another after they were accused of hiding their eyes and ears during deliberations.

It was Hill’s contention, according to Findling, that the chair’s use had saved lives by averting harm to others.

 

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