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Officials Encourage Californians to Save Electricity as Bay Area Temperatures Soar

Officials Encourage Californians to Save Electricity

Officials Encourage Californians to Save Electricity

Some areas of the San Francisco Bay Area have reached record highs, and state officials have issued a statewide blackout warning due to the extreme heat.

Located in the eastern portion of the Bay Area, Livermore saw temperatures of 116 degrees on Monday, the highest temperature ever recorded in the Bay Area.

The National Weather Service reports that on Monday, temperatures in Santa Rosa, California, reached 112 degrees, breaking the previous record of 110 degrees, and that temperatures in Gilroy, California, also reached 112 degrees, tying the record set in 2017 and 2020.

According to a video uploaded by Governor Gavin Newsom on Twitter on Tuesday, the state of California is currently experiencing a heat wave that may be the hottest and longest on record for the month of September.
California Independent System Operators (CAISO), who manage the state’s electrical system, say that they are on the verge of having to shut down the power grid because of the strain being placed on it.

The California Independent System Operator (CAISO) has expressed gratitude to Californians for their efforts to reduce the state’s overall energy consumption. “Electrical demand could reach over 51,000 megawatts on Tuesday,” CAISO warned, “the largest demand ever on the state’s energy grid, exceeding the previous high of 50,270 megawatts in 2006.”

Extreme heat is straining the electricity grid, so on Tuesday night, CAISO issued an Energy Emergency Alert asking residents to reduce their energy consumption.

The group recommended that people pre-cool their houses at night and lower their thermostats to 78 degrees, turn off unnecessary lights, and unplug electronics that weren’t in use during the day.

We are entering the worst phase of this heat wave, and the potential for outages is real and immediate,” Newsom added. It’s no surprise that the electrical grid is struggling to keep up with the increased demand caused by the triple-digit temperatures experienced over most of our state.

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