Twitter’s Solution To Destroying Verification Is Another Check Mark

Twitter is introducing a new verification badge to assist identify important accounts. According to a thread started by Twitter’s Esther Crawford, who is in charge of the new Twitter Blue effort, a blue checkmark is available for a monthly fee of $7.99, although select accounts for governments, companies, or public figures will get a gray “Official” checkmark instead.

For the most important accounts, Twitter is introducing a new verification badge. According to a thread started by Twitter’s Esther Crawford, who is spearheading the new Twitter Blue effort, a blue checkmark is available for $7.99 per month, however select accounts for governments, companies, or public figures will get a gray “Official” checkmark.

Twitter's Solution To Destroying Verification Is Another Check Mark
Twitter’s Solution To Destroying Verification Is Another Check Mark

According to Crawford, “many people have inquired how you’ll be able to distinguish between @TwitterBlue subscribers with blue checkmarks and accounts that have been confirmed as official,” therefore “Official” will be added to certain accounts upon launch.

Public figures, government agencies, private corporations, strategic alliances, the world’s preeminent media organizations, and significant publishers will all be recipients.

Even if you’ve already been verified in the past, that doesn’t guarantee you’ll obtain the new “Official” label, and you can’t purchase the label, either; Twitter will make the final decision. While Crawford did post a screenshot of the label on the @Twitter account, the label does not appear to have been implemented just yet.

There have been concerns that the verification checkmarks will no longer be effective at their primary function of preventing impersonation since Musk revealed that it would be included in the $8 per month Twitter Blue. After becoming a target of impersonators, Musk declared that anyone failing to properly identify themselves as a parody would be permanently banned.

However, that strategy is reactive rather than proactive, meaning that anyone intent on spreading false information may have time to do so before moderators step in. Given the new seal and the decision to postpone the launch of the new verification system until after Tuesday’s US midterm elections, it’s clear that the firm is aware of the problem.

 

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