The Chicago Mayoral Election Was Won by Brandon Johnson

On Tuesday, Brandon Johnson defeated Paul Vallas in a runoff election for mayor of Chicago. Johnson ran on a platform emphasizing his experience as a public school teacher, union organizer, and Cook County commissioner.

With 98.61% of the precincts reporting on Tuesday night, Johnson, 46, had 51.45% of the vote. With 48.55 percent of the vote, Vallas, 69, who ran on a platform of law and order, won. In a speech to his squad on Tuesday, Vallas admitted defeat.

After the election, Vallas told the gathering, “It’s clear, based on the results tonight, that the city is deeply divided,” and he offered his assistance with the transition. “I called Brandon Johnson a short time ago to congratulate him on winning this election,” Vallas tweeted.

“It’s critically important that we all come together now and work collaboratively to move our city forward. I thank my supporters and team, and especially my family. Thank you, Chicago.”

Once Vallas conceded, Johnson quickly addressed his fans to thank him and celebrate victory. “Tonight is just the beginning,” Johnson said. “Now Chicago will begin to work for its people.”

After losing her re-election bid in February, Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s constituents went to the polls at 7 p.m. to choose her successor. Lightfoot’s office released a statement promising to assist with the change in leadership.

“We have communicated to both teams that we stand ready to support the transition, including a meeting between the mayor and the mayor-elect at a mutually agreed upon time,” the mayor’s office wrote.

When compared to the current mayor, both Vallas and Johnson performed better in the election held on February 28. After Vallas, Johnson took second place. On Tuesday, voters faced many challenges when they went to the polls, including heavy security and sealed polling places.

After a student “possibly in possession of a gun” complaint caused Highland Park schools to temporary lockdown, voting was halted at many schools and community voting venues in Lake County. In addition, several locations reportedly experienced violent thunderstorms.

Brandon Johnson Wins Chicago Mayor's Race

Johnson ran on a platform of fully funding public schools, providing access to mental health care, providing affordable housing, and creating excellent employment. He cited his experience as a public school teacher, union organizer, and Cook County commissioner.

Johnson had earlier on Tuesday encouraged everyone to exercise their right to vote. “Our canvassing crew hit the streets early today to get out the vote!” Johnson wrote in a tweet. “We’re knocking doors, we’re making calls and we’re telling everyone we know: this is our moment. This is our time. Let’s seize it, and let’s win a better, safer, stronger Chicago.”

Once Vallas conceded, Johnson quickly addressed his fans to thank him and celebrate victory. “Tonight is just the beginning,” Johnson said. “Now Chicago will begin to work for its people.”

After losing her re-election bid in February, Chicago Mayor Lori Lightfoot’s constituents went to the polls at 7 p.m. to choose her successor. Lightfoot’s office released a statement promising to assist with the change in leadership.

We have communicated to both teams that we stand ready to support the transition, including a meeting between the mayor and the mayor-elect at a mutually agreed upon time,” the mayor’s office wrote.

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When compared to the current mayor, both Vallas and Johnson performed better in the election held on February 28. After Vallas, Johnson took second place. On Tuesday, voters faced many challenges when they went to the polls, including heavy security and sealed polling places.

After a student “possibly in possession of a gun” complaint caused Highland Park schools to temporary lockdown, voting was halted at many schools and community voting venues in Lake County. In addition, several locations reportedly experienced violent thunderstorms.

Johnson ran on a platform of fully funding public schools, providing access to mental health care, providing affordable housing, and creating excellent employment. He cited his experience as a public school teacher, union organizer, and Cook County commissioner.

Johnson had earlier on Tuesday encouraged everyone to exercise their right to vote. “Our canvassing crew hit the streets early today to get out the vote!” Johnson wrote in a tweet.

“We’re telling everyone we know that this is our time, and we’re knocking on doors and making phone calls to do it. Now is our chance. Take advantage of it, and together we can make Chicago a better, safer place to live.”

After voting on Tuesday morning, Johnson told reporters, “We are uniting this city.” “Voting for fully funded local schools, voting for mental health services, and voting for affordability are all promises as big as this city. Our vote is for a more prosperous and secure Chicago.”

During his campaign, former Illinois state representative and current Chicago Public Schools CEO Paul Vallas promised to “make Chicago the safest city in America” and regularly referred to public safety as a “basic right.”

“So many leaders and trailblazers in the Democratic Party are supporting our campaign because they know that our vision for a safer and more prosperous Chicago is possible if we can come together,” Vallas tweeted Monday before the election.

We need a strong, experienced voice in the mayor’s office. Someone who will draw his leadership team from the community and will bring people to the table who will unite the city,Vallas said. Martin Luther King III was among the first to extend his condolences to the city’s new mayor on Tuesday night.

“Congratulations to Mayor-elect @Brandon4Chicago and thank you, Chicago voters!” King wrote in a tweet. “I know he will lead with conviction and courage and center peace, justice and equity in his administration.”

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